Economy of scale...Reach out & Get in touch with an artist.

This week I was sharply confronted with the injustice of the economy of scale in the western world.

My son is a very sporty boy. One afternoon, after he played soccer, he asked for a sports drink. Stopping in at the petrol station he ran in to buy a drink. I gave him $5 and expected change. I received 10c. 10c!! $5 for a 375ml sports drink!

Currently our dairy farmers are struggling with price cuts and they can’t even get 37c per litre *. The dedication these farmers put into their work is staggering. Early mornings, in all weather, no holidays or weekends, caring for animals and they can’t even get paid a decent amount for their labour! I know this personally as our friends are dairy farmers.

In contrast, a global corporation, which is worth millions, can put $5 (retail) *on a synthetic mass produced beverage.

What is going on with the world?

Where is the economy of scale?

Lotus, monotype and pastel drawing, 56 x76 cm . From my 'In Season' series.

Lotus, monotype and pastel drawing, 56 x76 cm . From my 'In Season' series.

 Bland artwork from a bargain store

 Bland artwork from a bargain store

I bring this back to artists and handcrafted artwork. I speak for many artists when I say that we spend hours on our craft. We learn and practise our craft nearly every day. Like the dairy farmer, it is through long hours of dedication we produce our work. We are not mass produced. We are not global corporations. We are people with a passion, to create work for YOU.

These days’ people can go to a bargain store and buy a mass produced artwork. They have no real connection with the artwork, it simply is the correct colours for their wall and matches their furniture.

I ask the question, next time you want a piece, why don’t you make a connection with a local artist? You can find us on all social media these days.

Reach out. We don’t bite. We are sometimes shy but really appreciate a kind word about our work. It gives us motivation to keep on going.

Moreover, we appreciate your support, especially when you make a connection and buy our work. When you buy the work it is a beautiful reminder of your experience with the artisan. It evokes memories which are lasting. It is a purchase which keeps on giving, for both the artist and patron (buyer).

The local bargain shop doesn’t need your support regarding art. They have other products to sell which are mass produced.

Please support local artists. Buy branded milk. We may be a little more expensive but it is worth supporting local businesses.

Yours in art,

Bec xx

* Currently it is $1 litre retail for supermarket branded milk. I don’t know the cost price for sport drinks.    

Keeping up the tradition.

En plein air (French pronunciation: [ɑ̃ plɛn ɛʁ]) is a French expression which means "in the open air" and is particularly used to describe the act of painting outdoors, which is also called peinture sur le motif ("painting of the object(s) or what the eye actually sees") in French. It has its roots in the Impressionist movement (late 1800s) with Monet & Van Gogh but can be dated earlier with the Romantic Period (early 1800s) with Constable.

With the onset of Spring, my painting buddy Jacquie Mather and I decided to dust off the plein air box and get out among the vines to paint. Plein air has a long tradition in Australia ( with the Australian Impressionist painters Tom Roberts & Arthur Streeton) and is still firmly held as an important part of an artist's practice. It is both challenging and rewarding when you can capture the essence of the landscape through a mere stroke of the brush or drawing line.

A few pages from the sketchbook.

A few pages from the sketchbook.

With my painting buddy Jacquie. View looking down to Ivanhoe, Lindeman, Tinkler and Drayton vineyards from Mount View.

With my painting buddy Jacquie. View looking down to Ivanhoe, Lindeman, Tinkler and Drayton vineyards from Mount View.

Here a few photos from our recent sojourn up to Mount View. A wonderful day spent with my buddy over looking the Valley - just need to remember the sun brolly next time as the sun gave us a few more kisses than we would like! I intend on working these sketches up to larger paintings.

Bec xx

Spring has finally Sprung!

In June I had the bright idea of planting sweet peas in the veggie patch rather than veg. Who needs food when you have flowers?!

Over the cold winter, I watched and watched the patch but with no joy. Nothing grew. To my surprise what seemed a scene out of Jack and the Beanstalk, the sweet peas sprung to life with the onset of Spring. Now the house is fragrant with these freshly picked abundant blooms. The perfume is heady. I love it! One of the better decisions I've made recently. A beautiful lesson in patience and persistence.

Playing with the monotype process with pastel and charcoal drawing

Playing with the monotype process with pastel and charcoal drawing

Sweet Pea ( Lathyrus odoratus). Flower meaning: delicate, blissful pleasure and good-bye. Their name is derived from the Greek word lathyros for pea or pulse, together with the Latin word odoratus which means fragrant.

Bec xx

Heady fragrant blooms in the garden   

Heady fragrant blooms in the garden

 

Delicious purple colours

Delicious purple colours